How Monogram-matic are you?

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The use of Monograms can be dated as far back as 350 BC, when the Greeks used them to abbreviate the names of their cities for coins. But it is Royalty who created individualised monograms as a part of their royal seals to be used on their clothes and even on the uniforms of their staff.

Carrying forward a truly royal tradition, it is said a garment that carries a personal stamp exceeds any other form of luxury. And as far as personalisation goes, there are none that match up to the exclusiveness of the monogram on a shirt.

Over the years, monograms have represented a class of men who have stood for style, charisma and finesse. That’s why at Vitruvien.com we believe that a monogram can add a lot of personality to your shirt with the right touch of elegance.

How Monogram-matic are you

And like any object of class, its subtlety is a matter to be impressed upon. To create that sublime impression, we recommend a few pointers for your maiden monogram:

1. Shirt

A monogram is as classy as it gets, but put it on all your shirts and it’ll lose its charm. We recommend you reserve this option to a few, preferably, formal shirts. Solid coloured shirts look great with monograms as do checks and stripes. Patterns however, make the appearance of the monogram look busy and we suggest you avoid them.

2. Placement

Ideally the left shirt cuff button or left cuff edge and inside of the collar are the acceptable places to get a monogram done. Some men prefer it to be on the shirt pocket or directly on the fabric where the pocket would have been on pocket-less shirts, although that could be construed as ostentatious. Always remember, understated = classy and not otherwise.

How Monogram-matic are you

3. Font

This can get very tricky if you decide to experiment. We advise sticking to certain accepted conventions. And by conventions we mean block or script fonts. Of course you might be exposed to a few specialty-fancy fonts, but just remember that fonts should not overshadow the shirt itself.

4. Colour

While a few accepted colours will be available to you, it is important to keep in mind that the monogram doesn’t look garish because of the colour chosen. We agree, colour is a matter of personal taste, nonetheless we recommend opting for contrasting colours to keep it simple and tasteful. Another recommendation is to try tone on tone. It’s subtle and understated, yet brilliant.

5. Number of Letters

Two letters look elegant. You can also go in for three letters àla JFK. However, avoid more than 3 letters. You don’t want it to look like a logo on a uniform.

Now that you know the essentials of getting a monogram done, you can get started on your very own personalised shirt customised to the ‘T’ at Vitruvien.com.

Credit: http://www.mensxp.com